Friday Focus Archives

  • Stephen Hawking’s Productive Laziness

    Productive Laziness. It may sound like a silly oxymoron, but even minds like that of Stephen Hawking practiced it. So, what is it? Read on to find out.   In the 1980s, at the height of his intellectual productivity, Stephen Hawking used to head home from his office between five and six. He rarely worked later. Here’s ...
  • Never Run Another Bad Meeting. Here’s How.

    This week, we’re going to talk about meetings (yes, again). More specifically, how you can run a “good” meeting:   Many meetings fail because they try to do too much. The problem is that the meeting becomes so jam-packed with stuff that it has no focus; it’s a messy closet where you can’t find the thing you ...
  • 3 Ways to Make Time for the Little Tasks You Never Make Time For

    We’d all like to spend our time at work on high-value activities. But every professional faces a relentless deluge of niggling tasks – be it the overflowing inbox or the articles you really ought to read. This week, we look at how you can make time for the little things that you never make time for:   This ...
  • Most Common Productivity Killers in the Workplace – Week 2

    Last week, we visited our blog to discuss two of the most notorious productivity killer in the workplace – meetings and surfing the internet. This week, we look at two more:   Email. If you thought surfing the web was distracting and costly, it can’t really compare at all to the damage wreaked by emails; that friendly modern ...
  • Most Common Productivity Killers in the Workplace – Week 1

    This week we return to our blog to explore the most common productivity killers in the workplace. Data recently released by Pulp PR broke it down to four main things that today’s offices are unfortunately too full of. At Frontier Research we too have found ourselves grappling with these issues as we try to manage our ...
  • Everything You Thought You Knew About Competition is Wrong

    Many economists view monopolies in a negative light and they do deserve their bad reputation, but only in a world that never changes. This week, in another installment from our blog, we take a look at how being a monopoly can mean shifting paradigms and creating true innovation!   When we look at competition we look at our ...
  • Knaves and Divas: Google’s Secrets to Recruitment

    This week, we return our own blog to look at one of the most important aspects of management – recruitment. Recruitment is integral to any firm. A manager should strive to find the best employee for the job. But who exactly is “the best employee for the job”? We can get a clue into what to look ...
  • How to Beat Procrastination – Week 2

    Last week, we checked out how we can make the benefits of action feel bigger in order to beat procrastination. This week, we look at how we can make the costs of an action feel smaller:   Identify the first step. Sometimes we’re just daunted by the task we’re avoiding. The trick here is to break down big, ...
  • How to Beat Procrastination – Week 1

    Procrastination is the bane of productivity. So, how can you become less myopic about your elusive tasks? It’s all about rebalancing the cost-benefit analysis: make the benefits of action feel bigger, and the costs of action feel smaller. This week, we look at how we can make the benefits feel bigger and more real:   Visualize how great ...
  • If You’re Not Outside Your Comfort Zone, You Won’t Learn Anything

    Public speaking, networking and speaking up at meetings. What do these 3 things have in common? They are all personally terrifying for many people, but professionally important. This week we look at how important it is to walk outside our comfort zones when looking for personal growth:   You need to speak in public, but your knees buckle ...
  • Want to Be More Productive? Sit Next to Someone Who Is

    Employers and employees alike are constantly looking for ways to improve productivity. But the answer could be much simpler than one might think. This week, we look at how better seating arrangements can help increase productivity:   To increase worker performance, employers often invest in a number of things, from rewards and incentives to education and training. These ...
  • An economic theory developed in 1817 can help you cut your to-do list in half

    We all use to-do lists. Most often we use them to remember what’s most important and do that first. But do we have to be the one to do every task on the list? This week, we look at how we can trim our to-do lists using the economic theory of comparative advantage:   The problem with my lengthy ...
  • How Unnecessarily Ambitious Deadlines Can Crush Progress

    Deadlines are a modern tool of productivity. We often use them to create urgency and get stuff done. But can we make something “too urgent”? This week, we look at how setting overly ambitious deadlines can actually harm your progress:   A false deadline is a hard stop you give yourself for some non-consequential reason. It could be ...
  • The Best Ways to Get Through Hundreds of Emails In One Day

    Email. We’ve spoken about it before and here we are again. This week we’ll look at a few tips we can use to reach that elusive nirvana that is “inbox zero”:   If reading and responding to emails leaves you exhausted and oppressed, it’s time to get your inbox under control. As your inbox gets cluttered and jammed ...
  • How to Use Stress to Your Advantage

    Stress, we have to get rid of it! Or do we? This week we explore how stress is one of our natural responses to the world and how we could even use it to our advantage:   Many self-help models suggest that a satisfying life can only be found when you get rid of negative thoughts and feelings. ...