Your Brain Can Only Take So Much Focus

The ability to focus is an important driver of excellence. But can the opposite be true as well?

This week we look at how “unfocus” can help build creativity and better decision making (along with a few ways you can add unfocus to your day!):

 

Focused techniques such as to-do lists, timetables, and calendar reminders all help people to stay on task. The problem is that excessive focus exhausts the focus circuits in your brain. As a result, decisions are poorly thought-out, and you become less collaborative.

In keeping with recent research, both focus and unfocus are vital. The brain operates optimally when it toggles between focus and unfocus, allowing you to develop resilience, enhance creativity, and make better decisions too.

When you unfocus, you engage a brain circuit called the “default mode network.” Under the brain’s conscious radar, it activates old memories, goes back and forth between the past, present, and future, and recombines different ideas. Using this new and previously inaccessible data, you develop enhanced self-awareness and a sense of personal relevance. And you can imagine creative solutions or predict the future, thereby leading to better decision-making too.

There are many simple and effective ways to activate this circuit in the course of a day.

Using positive constructive daydreaming (PCD): PCD is a type of mind-wandering different from slipping into a daydream or guiltily rehashing worries. When you build it into your day deliberately, it can boost your creativity, strengthen your leadership ability, and also-re-energize the brain.

Taking a nap: Not all naps are the same. When your brain is in a slump, your clarity and creativity are compromised. After a 10-minute nap, studies show that you become much clearer and more alert.

Pretending to be someone else: When you’re stuck in a creative process, unfocus may also come to the rescue when you embody and live out an entirely different personality.

 

Using these techniques to build unfocus into our day, we may be able to “preserve focus for when we need it, and use it much more efficiently too”.

Visit the Harvard Business Review for more.

Catch up on your favorite Friday Focus in our Archives page!

The Global Economy in July

July began with a scare of a potential selloff  in emerging market (EM) assets. This was triggered by talk of developed market Central Banks starting to end the era of monetary easing. Alongside the US Federal Reserve’s interest rate hikes and balance sheet unwinding, the Canadian central bank raised rates and the European Central Bank signaled willingness to consider changes to its bond buying program. However, the switch in market sentiment was short lived thanks to Fed Chairwoman Janet Yellen’s dovish statements in her testimony to the US Congress. The outflows reversed and the Institute of International Finance (IIF) reported $20 billion in portfolio inflows to EMs in July.

To some market commentators the episode of EM weakness signaled that international investors were ready to let go of their EM debt investments as soon as global markets wobble. This has prompted fund managers to be cautious of their investments especially in terms of market liquidity giving them space to exit. However, analysts saw the episode as a short period of time in which asset prices adjusted to reflect the hawkishness of developed market central banks.

While Emerging Markets were helped by a weakening US dollar, developed markets were helped by an improving Eurozone economy. In the IMF’s July World Economic Outlook report, it highlighted that global growth in 2017 was being driven by the EU alongside Japan and China. In the meantime it also downgraded US growth outlook slightly, citing the failure of the Trump administration to deliver on its promised fiscal stimulus. The IMF also indicated that the US dollar and British pound were overvalued, relative to fundamentals, while the euro, yen and yuan are seen as being in line with fundamentals.

Brent oil prices made gains in July and increased above the $50 mark reaching $52.65 on July 31st. This was largely driven by higher US demand and reductions in crude oil stockpiles in the US. It was also helped by outcomes of a meeting among major oil producers in St. Petersburg on the 24th, where Nigeria agreed to cap its output and Saudi indicated limits to their exports. But the gains were capped by high OPEC production, primarily due to Libyan and Nigerian output.

Use a Compass Not a Map for Future Success

The future is impossible to predict with perfect accuracy. So, how do leaders forge ahead into this uncharted territory? They ditch the map and use a compass!

This week, we look at how compass leadership may be the way forward:

 

Before the Internet, life seemed simpler, easier to grasp. People in positions of power gave their employees check lists to complete. And they would do their job and wait for next tasks.

Nowadays, life is increasingly unpredictable and even the idea of leaders with all the right responses seems old-fashioned. This is the big question searching for answers now, “How do I participate responsibly in a system almost impossible to predict.”

The excitement of today is that anyone with an idea can make it come alive. You can create it, publish it, pitch it, without proposals or permission. And, without a lot of money. It’s the end of the MBA era and the beginning of the design innovation era.

The reason for a compass not a map is…

Maps are stationary, may be dated and causes frustration when inaccurate.
Maps provide a description; a compass provides vision and direction.
Maps can slow you down when the path is not clear.
Maps cannot show you how to get on that road not traveled.
Maps are poor indicators of what is unfamiliar.

The older command and control style of leading is about maps. It’s about going on a chosen course and staying there, no deviations.

Compass leadership is about a process of discovery. It’s about learning as you go along. It’s about more than one right path. It’s about hunches and taking chances.

 

“Business is complex and volatile and those who don’t read the signs of the times will be left behind”.

Visit Inc.com for more like this.

Catch up on your favorite Friday Focus in our Archives page!

Snapshot of the Economy – July 2017

At Frontier, we love trying out new ways to help our audience make sense of the economy.

Here’s a quick look at how key economic indicators are performing so far in the year, with an easy-to-understand snapshot.

For this update we have chosen the variables we consider to be most important in understanding the health of the Sri Lankan economy.

*Please note this does not indicate our outlook on each of these variables, but provides our understanding of how it has been performing based on the latest available data.

The key to understanding their performance:

    Improving

   Manageable

   Worsening

 

Gross Official Reserves: Stable at US$6.9bn levels in June following inflows from the sovereign issue

Trade deficit: Imports growing at a faster pace than exports in the Jan to May period

Foreign holdings: Consistent inflows slowly trickling in; Rs. 40 bn inflows from mid-Feb to end-June

Global situation: Positive for EMs and FMs

USD/LKR: Gradual depreciation

 

Credit to private sector: Rs.300 bn absolute growth during the first half of 2017, despite YOY slowdown

Inflation: Easing from record-highs despite sustained supply side pressures

 

If you want a look at the underlying numbers on each of these variables, please click here

Tourism Insights – Interview transcripts


Topic: Outlook for the Tourism Sector

Video Link – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mMnm0UbMasg

Speaker: Travis Gomez

Video length – 14:54 mins

0.30:      How was the tourism sectors performance in 2016?

  • Tourist arrivals close to 2.05 mn which was below government target
  • This was partly due to extraordinary events during the year such as flooding as well as slowdown in arrivals from Middle Eastern markets towards the 2H of the year
  • Nevertheless 2H2016 showed strong tourism growth of 12% YoY

1:30:      More Recent performance

  • A slowdown in arrivals was anticipated given the runway work taking place at the International airport
  • As a result growth in arrivals Slowdown in 3% in 1Q2017
  • But this was not as bad as was expected by hotel operators who expected a much greater slowdown

2:00 New developments in tourist arrivals

  • Composition of tourist arrivals shifting from traditional markets such as German, France towards Asian Markets
  • The Asian region accounts for 47% of tourist arrivals
  • India and China are the top two source markets for tourism to Sri Lanka
  • Shift in global spending power and the greater wiliness of tourists from China to travel further afield may account for this trend

4:00 Why are tourists spending less time in Colombo?

  • Foreign guest nights in Sri Lanka is 10 nights which has been fairly stable for 5 years
  • In contrast the foreign guest nights in Colombo is only 2.1 nights and has been slightly trending down over the same period
  • One possible reason is there is less of a need to spend time in Colombo for transit purposes (ie: getting to and from the airport) with the opening up of expressways to other parts of the Island
  • Another reason is that Colombo is not perceived as a tourist destination
  • This maybe due to a lack of awareness and a lack of marketing on the experiences and unique landmarks that can be visited and experienced in Colombo

6:20 How do we attract the high end tourists?

  • Tourism spending has grown from USD 89 per day 5-7 years ago to USD 160
  • This will naturally increase further due to the shift in the tourism mix to regional markets where tourists from these regions have a higher propensity to spend on things such as shopping
  • But In order to increase this even further, the focus should be on attracting more MICE tourists who typically have a higher spending power.
  • To attract more MICE tourists the general attractiveness of Colombo must be increased
  • In order to attract organizers of MICE events to pick Sri Lanka as a destination, there must be sufficient activities in Colombo to attract these tourists as they have limited time to spend in a country.

8:30 How to position Sri Lanka beyond a Sun & Sand destination?

  • The preferences of tourists are now shifting towards experiential/ adventure tourism
  • While the pristine beaches and natural beauty is a big draw for tourists, focusing exclusively on the resort aspect is not enough
  • If we want to tourists to spend a longer time in the country and encourage repeat visitors, we need to package Sri Lanka as having a multitude of attractions

9:45 Do we have enough capacity to accommodate higher tourist arrivals?

  • Don’t really see a problem on the supply side as many hotels and supplementary establishments are commencing operations
  • In Colombo alone around 1000 new rooms are going to be added in the next two years
  • It’s going to be a much more competitive environment as well with the entry of International hotel chains
  • Local hotel operators in Colombo would have to pa attention to these developments carefully as City Hotels have typically been the best performing category of hotels due to their ability to attract both foreign and domestic visitors.

A Face-to-Face Request Is 34 Times More Successful than an Email

Research suggests that requests made in person are more effective than those made over email. How much more effective? Well, according to this piece by Vanessa Bohns, 34 times more effective!

 

Despite the reach of email, asking in person is the significantly more effective approach; you need to ask six people in person to equal the power of a 200-recipient email blast. Still, most people tend to think the email ask will be more effective.

We found that people were much more likely to agree to complete a survey when they were asked in-person as opposed to over email. These findings are consistent with previous research showing that people are more likely to comply with requests in person than over email.

Why do people think of email as being equally effective when it is so clearly not? In our studies, participants were highly attuned to their own trustworthiness and the legitimacy of the action they were asking others to take when they sent their emails. Anchored on this information, they failed to anticipate what the recipients of their emails were likely to see: an untrustworthy email asking them to click on a suspicious link.

Indeed, when we replicated our results in a second study we found the nonverbal cues requesters conveyed during a face-to-face interaction made all the difference in how people viewed the legitimacy of their requests, but requesters were oblivious to this fact.

It is often more convenient and comfortable to use text-based communication than to approach someone in-person, but if you overestimate the effectiveness of such media, you may regularly—and unknowingly—choose inferior means of influence.

 

If your office runs on email and text-based communication, it’s worth considering whether you could be a more effective communicator by having conversations in person.

For more, visit the Harvard Business Review.

Catch up on your favorite Friday Focus in our Archives page!

Do vs. Done Lists: Jot Down Your Small Wins to Amplify Success

To-Do lists are great tools for productivity, but only looking at what you have to do  can increase stress or anxiety and cloud creative thought.

The solution? Keep a done list to log what you’ve accomplished!

 

It’s interesting to note that according to research, having a sense of making progress with work that matters to us is the most influential factor in maximizing long-term creative output, positive emotions, and motivation. The problem is, for some of us, focusing on what’s next (for example: our to-do lists) means we skate right past our wins, no matter how big or small they are. How do we train ourselves, over time, to notice progress? We already keep a to-do list. Why not add a done list?

A done list is a log of the tasks you’ve completed. Keeping a done list has the power to fortify your motivation, and heighten positive emotions like joy and pride. When we reflect on progress, we practically metabolize it. Jot down completed tasks, and view them as “wins,” or progress towards your final goal(s), and you can externalize and recognize them.”

Keeping a done list in addition to your to-do list is a quick and simple way to increase success and well-being. How do you create these lists in a way that fits your needs? Here are some approaches to try:

  • Every Friday, set aside 10 minutes to jot down your wins for the week.
  • Keep a done list for each project you work on.
  • Encourage any teams you manage or work with to periodically discuss progress.

The done list means that we can create motivation no matter where we find ourselves or what’s happening around us.

 

We got this from the Evernote Blog, check them out for more!

Catch up on your favorite Friday Focus in our Archives page!

Why Deep Work Matters in a Distracted World

From the moment we wake in the morning, we’re tempted. Reach for the phone. Check texts. Read email.

So, how do we get anything important done? Enter “Deep Work”.

 

The idea of ‘deep work’ is nothing new. The term was recently coined by Cal Newport, a professor, scientist, and author of “Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World.” According to Newport, deep work is classified as ‘professional activities performed in a state of distraction-free concentration that push your cognitive capabilities to their limits.’

“We have a growing amount of research which tells us that if you spend large portions of your day in a state of fragmented attention—where your regular workflow is constantly broken up by taking frequent breaks to just check in with social media—that this can permanently reduce your capacity for concentration,” said Newport. Much of social media is specifically built to fragment your time.

Even a quick glance at Twitter or reviewing an email has a negative impact on your ability to focus on tasks. In fact, that one quick glance costs you about 15 to 20 minutes of attention loss. Our brains are simply not wired for that level of distraction. In addition to impacting our cognitive ability to get work done, it also concerns medical professionals, who are seeing increased rates of anxiety [and] other psychological issues among college students.

Here are some tactics to integrate the principles of deep work into your schedule:

  • Work deeply.  Newport created an equation to explain the intensity required of deep work. Work accomplished = (time spent) x (intensity)

  • Protect your time. Maintain a set of rituals and routines to ease deep work into your day more easily. Try implementing scheduling tactics into your workflow.
  • Train your brain to do nothing.
  • Quit swimming upstream. Decide for yourself what restrictions you can place on email and social media.
  •  Cut the shallow work. Endless meeting requests and instant email responses are turning knowledge workers into ‘human routers’.

 

By understanding how to distance ourselves from distractions and improve time management, we have a better chance to dive deeper into our thinking and reach new heights of productivity.

For more like this, visit the Evernote Blog.

Catch up on your favorite Friday Focus in our Archives page!

Tourism Insights – Experiential tourisms – Part 2: Is it something worth worrying about?

In this second part of our review of the potential for experiential tourism in Sri Lanka, we investigate the tourism earnings from experiential tourism and ask the question as to whether promoting experiential tourism should be a focus for the tourism strategy of Sri Lanka.

What the Data has to say

Again, turning to the data provided by the SLTDA’s in its latest annual report, here are a couple of interesting insights we discovered from the data:

Earnings growth from Experiential Tourism negligible

The earnings growth from experiential tourism related activities has historically shown a tendency to lag the overall earnings from tourism. As a result, the contribution of experiential tourism to overall earnings has been on a declining trend and by 2015, its contribution was less than 1% of total earnings. However, in 2016 there was a significant jump in tourist arrivals for such activities which contributed towards a 78% growth in earnings from such activities. This led to an increase in its contribution to 1.2% of total tourist earnings.

 

Sigiriya outpaces other attractions in terms of its earning potential

As we observed earlier with tourist arrivals, where the lion share of arrivals was accounted for by a few sites (Sigiriya and Polonnaruwa in the case of Cultural sites and Yala, Horton Plains and Udawalawa in the case of wildlife parks), a similar trend can be observed with regard to foreign tourist earnings at these sites.

Hence, Sigiriya which accounts for the highest number of foreign tourist arrivals also brought in LKR 2.2 bn in earnings from the foreign tourists, outpacing most other attractions.

 

But Earnings per tourist is highest for Anurahapura historical sites

Considering the tourist earnings from a per visitor point of view also reveals some interesting insights in terms of the earnings trends of varied attractions.  With regard to attractions in the cultural triangle, it is Interesting to note that while Sigiriya attracts more visitors than Anuradhapura (in 2016 Sigiriya attracted 562 k visitors vs. 77k visitors to Anuradhapura) the per tourist earnings is higher for the latter and in 2015 & 2016 it was the highest when compared with all other attractions.

With regard to nature based attractions, the earnings per tourist at Pinnawala has been fairly unchanged while some of the Wildlife parks have witnessed a moderate improvement. The Colombo Museum too has witnessed some improved earnings though it remains at a much lower level compared to other attractions.

 

 

The role of pricing in earnings

This also brings up the question as to whether some of these attractions are priced optimally. A comparison of the significant attractions in Sri Lanka reveal that Sigiriya which is the most recognized and distinct site in Sri Lanka commands a premium which may partly account for it recording the highest tourist earnings. In contrast, the Colombo National Museum is amongst he most affordable attraction.

Source: Leisure Tours

 

Source: Leisure Tours, attraction websites

Key Question: Should we focus on promoting experiential tourism given the low returns?

Hotel Operators claim that for the vast majority of tourists to Sri Lanka, the main appeal is the Sandy Beaches and tropical climate. Some veterans in the hotel industry have therefore claimed that given this factor, tourism in Sri Lanka should be promoted in accordance with this and be geared towards attracting “Sun, Sand and Beach” tourists. Hence they raise the question of the return on investment in promoting attractions such as heritage, wildlife, nature reserves etc. that fall under the purview of experiential tourism, particularly given the low returns in terms of tourism earnings arising from such activities.

However, we would argue that while the pristine beaches of Sri Lanka maybe the main draw for visitors to the country, if the government is to achieve its objective of increasing the foreign guest nights and the daily tourism expenditure, there needs to be a greater focus on experiential tourism in order to encourage repeat visitors. A recent panel discussion organized by the Hotel association of Sri Lanka highlighted the fact that increasing the number of guest nights in Colombo by even a single day through the promotion of more activities/ points of interest in Colombo can have a significant impact on the earnings from tourism.

In addition, given that most of these sites such as Sigiriya, Yala, Pinnawala that draw many tourists are not contemporary attractions but rather ancient ruins or nature based resources, there is a much greater need to invest in the conservation of these resources. Hence part of the motive for enhancing the earnings potential of such sites should be to better conserve the sites thus ensuring its sustainability for future generations.

Looking at it from a global perspective, we have compared the entry fees of some of the Sri Lankan attractions which are classified as UNESCO World Heritage sites with other similar attractions found abroad and we have observed that the earning potential of these sites are far greater than the current earnings of the attractions in Sri Lanka which indicates that there is greater potential to increase the earnings from these experiences.

Source: Travel & Leisure website

The Bottom line: So what can be done about it?

Taking into account the data that was highlighted with respect to the tourist arrivals and earnings of experiential tourism in Sri Lanka, the key challenge therefore would be to increase the attractiveness and earnings potential of these attractions while avoiding the problems of overcrowding.

Promote more sites to reduce overcrowding at popular sites

It is clear that part of the reason for the overcrowding is that tourists tend to congregate in few locations leading to overcrowding. While from the tourist’s point of view it would be rational for them to focus on the “main attractions” given the limited time, overcrowding at these locations could result in diminishing the experience and attractiveness of a location.  Hence, there is a need to broad base the appeal of attractions that tend to get overlooked in order to reduce overcrowding and facilitate the development of other sites.

Limit number of visitors to enhance earnings

At the same time, in the case of attractions such as the Wildlife parks, Sigiriya rock where there would be stricter limits on the optimal carrying capacity of a location, tighter measures may have to be followed in order to ensure the long term sustainability of such locations. By the use of systems such as timed entry tickets, day/night time entry as well as having a cap on the maximum number of tourists that can visit the site during a day, you can better ensure that the resources of the site are not overtaxed while providing a more pleasant experience for the tourists that visit the site. This would also enable popular sites to possible charge higher entry rates and thus improve the earnings potential.

Improve the accessibility of attractions to limit overcrowding

Incremental investments can be made at selected attractions in order to improve the accessibility of certain sites to accommodate a larger volume and variety of tourists. For example, installing more ticket counters and restroom facilities can reduce the waiting times at attractions which is a key challenge at many locations. In addition, in the case of historical sites such as Anuradhapura and Pollonaruwa, low cost strategies such as having a designated route for tourists to take can greatly improve the flow of visitors and minimize overcrowding.

Create more activities at a given attraction

Incremental developments can be made at certain attractions in order to increase the variety of activities that can be found at the location in order to reduce overcrowding. For example, a lot of the overcrowding in Sigiriya happens at the Lion’s paws where everyone makes a beeline to climb the rock. Instead of restricting the experience of Sigiriya to simply climbing a rock, it can be broadened to include tours of the water gardens and the ancient town, an interactive museum. Walks through the nature reserves surrounding the rock which are filled with wildlife and birds and has the potential for bird watching activities. This would also help improve earnings of a given site as most comparable attractions abroad charge combined ticket prices which gives full access to varied sites in a given location.

 

Written by :Travis Gomez
For any queries and comments contact travis@frontiergroup.info
Disclaimer:
This information has been compiled from sources believed to be reliable but Frontier Research Private Limited does not warrant its completeness or accuracy. Opinions and estimates constitute our judgment as of the date of the material and are subject to change without notice.

Tourism Insights – Experiential Tourism – Part 1: too little or too much of a good thing?

The changing face of tourism in Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka has been experiencing double digit growth in tourist arrivals with over 2 mn tourists visiting the country in 2016. With a target of 2.5 mn arrivals for this year, and a target of over 4.5 mn arrivals by 2020 set by the government, the direction of the government as well as the private sector is that, more is better. At the same time, there has been growing concern with regard to the problem of overcrowding at certain popular tourist attractions in the Island. There have been reports of overcrowding in Sigiriya as well as traffic jams in Yala Wildlife park leading to even animals getting run over (Read More: Daily Mirror). While this has sparked a debate within the industry on what is the optimal balance of tourist arrivals, the overcrowding at some of these cultural and natural attractions indicates a growing interest in what can be termed as “Experiential tourism”

The rise of Experiential tourism

Since independence, the traditional markets of tourist arrivals to Sri Lanka were from Europe (including countries such as Germany, France and UK) where the main attraction of Sri Lanka; as veteran’s in the hospitality Industry would put it; is “Sun, Sand and Beach”. More recently, a shift in consumer preferences is noted with the change in economic circumstances which has led to a growth in arrivals from non-traditional markets led by tourists from India and China, along with growing awareness amongst visitors of the environmental impacts of tourism and the need for sustainability and conservation.  While “sun, sand and Beach” remains a core component of Sri Lanka’s offerings, the above reasons have led to a widening of Sri Lanka’s offerings to include more experiential and culturally rewarding tourist attractions. This could range from taking curated walks in a city’s historic centre, camping outdoors in a bird sanctuary, visiting museums, art galleries etc. to get a sense of the culture of the destination. The Sri Lanka Tourism Development Authority’s (SLTDA) annual report, classifies a number of tourism activities in Sri Lanka as Museums, Wildlife Parks, Zoological & Botanical gardens and the cultural triangle. For the purpose of this analysis, we have treated all of these activities as being part of “Experiential Tourism”.

What the data has to say

Based on the data provided by the SLTDA, here are a couple of interesting insights we noted:

Faster growth in experiential tourists in 2016

The experiential tourist arrivals grew at a rate of 48% YoY in 2016, outpacing overall tourist arrivals growth which increased at a rate 14% over the same period. Visitors to the cultural triangle alone saw a 2.5x growth from 355 k tourists in 2015 to 905k in 2016.

 

But less than 50% of foreign tourists choose to go for experiential tourism.

While 2016 saw a strong growth in experiential tourism, in the context of total tourist arrivals which stood at 2.05 mn in 2016, the attractiveness of even popular locations is comparatively low. Sigiriya was the most popular attractions with a little over 1/4th of total tourist arrivals in Sri Lanka visiting the site while Yala was the most popular wildlife park attracting 13% of tourists.

 

Wildlife parks gaining popularity

The proportion of experiential tourists visiting popular wildlife parks such Yala, Horton Plains which are in a natural setting has increased while the number visiting places with “Built-in environments” such as the Pinnawala Elephant Orphanage, the Dehiwela Zoo and the Peradeniya and Hakgala Botanical gardens have witnessed a slower pace of growth and hence a decline in their relative share.

 

Few sites/activities account for the lion share of the tourist arrivals

In 2016, the two sites; Sigiriya and Polonnaruwa had accounted for nearly 90% of all visitors to the cultural triangle . With respect to Wildlife Parks, nearly 70% of arrivals were distributed among 3 parks while there are 23 locations throughout the island that have been identified by the SLTDA as Wildlife parks. This trend highlights the fact that tourism in Sri Lanka is not sufficiently broad based and to a certain extent explains the issue of overcrowding which takes place at certain popular locations.

Key Question: Is there already too many tourists?

It is clear from the above data that while experiential tourism is has not been as significant in the past, the trend is clearly that it is growing in importance and is expected to continue to do so in the future. Hence a question that can be raised is if given the overcrowding that is taking place at some of these attractions, should attempts be made to restrict tourist arrivals.

To provide some context to this question, we did a global comparison of the tourist arrivals numbers of some of Sri Lanka’s UNESCO world Heritage Sites with some other similar attractions found abroad and we observe that these sites are able to accommodate much larger volumes of annual tourist arrivals.

 

Source: Travel & Leisure website

 

Hence, we believe that with proper planning and by increasing accessibility it is possible to increase the popularity of experiential tourism attractions in Sri Lanka while limiting the negative impacts of overcrowding.

 

In part 2 we will explore the earnings contribution of experiential tourism and give our recommendations on what can be done to enhance experiential tourism in Sri Lanka

Click here to continue to Tourism-insights – experiential tourism Part 2    

 

Disclaimer:
This information has been compiled from sources believed to be reliable but Frontier Research Private Limited does not warrant its completeness or accuracy. Opinions and estimates constitute our judgment as of the date of the material and are subject to change without notice.