The Global Economy in August

The highlight during the month of August was the growing tensions and uncertainty created by North Korea’s aggressive actions; threatening the US pacific territory of Guam, firing a missile over Japan and carrying out its sixth nuclear test – claimed to be a hydrogen bomb. Their actions were met by President Trump’s rhetoric when he threatened North Korea with “fire and fury”.

The rising tensions caused major stock markets to dip while there was increased demand for ‘Safe Haven’ assets like the Yen and Gold. However, markets as a whole have not moved dramatically. As some analysts put it, markets cannot price in an existential situation like a North Korea focused nuclear exchange.

According to the Institute of International Finance (IIF), emerging markets have seen a slowdown in capital flows during August with a $4bn drop from the previous month and the lowest since January. IIF earlier said that while EM investors continue to take on credit risk in search for yield, they appear to have turned slightly negative on EM currency risk despite recent U.S. dollar weakness. US dollar weakness has allowed most EM currencies to appreciate vis-à-vis the dollar.

The search for yield in fixed income assets has seen Tajikistan issuing its first ever international dollar bond with a yield of 7.125%, while the yield on Mongolia’s 2021 dollar bond dropped below 6%. This risk appetite continues even as certain bearish market commentators see EM trades as being crowded and due for a correction.

Markets also focused on the minutes of the US Federal Reserve meeting, which showed that there was disagreement on whether the weak inflation was transitory or not. While some officials claimed that the inflation numbers do not support further rate hikes, others, including the Chairperson, insisted on its transitory nature. September 6th saw the Fed Vice Chair, Stanley Fischer, resigning – effective from mid-October – due to ‘personal reasons’ and increasing the empty seats on the Board of Governors to four.

Brent crude oil prices stayed above the $50 a barrel mark during the month and was majorly affected by three factors. First, prices reduced early in the month as the July OPEC output reached record highs. Second, prices were helped up by supply disruptions in Libya and drops in US stockpiles. Finally, the end of the month saw Hurricane Harvey creating an interesting situation. Despite affecting US oil infrastructure in Texas, crude oil prices reduced due to the reduced demand for crude as refineries shutdown.

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